Tip of the Week: Leveraging Two-Factor Authentication on Facebook

If you’re like its over 2.19 billion other active users, Facebook has quite a bit of your personal information stored in it, and the risks that this implies only grow if your business is also represented on the social network. If your account isn’t protected as much as it could be, you could find yourself at risk of identity theft or other crimes. This is why we recommend activating two-factor authentication on Facebook.

Two-factor authentication (or 2FA) has actually been available on Facebook for quite some time. However, before a few much-needed changes were made recently, there were a few drawbacks to using it. First and foremost, the user needed to provide Facebook with their phone number, which many people didn’t really want to do. This wasn’t helped by the fact that, just a few months before the changes were made, Facebook announced that their previous 2FA system had a bug. This bug caused any replies to mobile Facebook notifications from 362-65 (the 2FA number Facebook would use) to post on the user’s profile page.

Now, Facebook plays nice with applications like Google Authenticator and Duo Security, and has made the setup process much more utilizable for the average user. The timing on this change couldn’t be better, either, as quite a few two-factor authentication hacks have surfaced from the weaker SMS-based 2FA – meaning that your best move is to avoid using texts to enable your 2FA permissions. Admittedly, an extra layer of security isn’t a bad thing to have, but there’s evidence that hackers have the capability to snatch your 2FA codes to access your accounts.

Setting up 2FA for Facebook is pretty straightforward:

  • Access Settings
  • Navigate to Security and Login
  • Select Use two-factor authentication
  • Choose the account you want to use as your authenticator.

2FA is just an extra piece of security to keep your information safe.

 

Tip of the Week: Using Less Data on Android

Mobile data is extremely important to the productivity and efficiency of modern businesses–especially when employees and administrators are out of the office. The major drawback of this is that it can be an expensive setup, as mobile data transfer can be pricey. We can help you get around this issue by minimizing the amount of data your Android device uses.

Checking Your Data Usage

If you want to use less data, the first step is to see how much you’re currently using. To do this, you want to see where most of your data is being used. You can do so by accessing ​System Settings ​and going to your ​Network and Internet ​options. Under this, select​ Mobile data usage​. You’ll then be shown a list of all your applications, as well as how much data they are using. This setting can also show you whether the data was used in the background or during the user’s activity.

Placing Caps on Your Apps

Once you’ve figured out your problem apps, you can put measures in place to limit how much data they consume:

Limit your updates​: Some apps will constantly refresh themselves, which can burn through your mobile data faster than you’d like. Some examples of these are social media applications that update news feeds. You can cut back on how often these applications update their information in two ways. The first includes going to each app’s settings and looking for the option to reduce the amount of data than an app uses in the background. If this doesn’t work, go back to your system settings and access that particular app’s settings to deactivate background data. This isn’t always the best option for apps like messaging that need to refresh in the background in order to work.

Deactivate certain features:​ Some apps have features included that go through more data than you’d like. Examples are auto-play and high-quality streaming. You can change these settings individually by going into the app’s specific settings. Doing this can greatly decrease the amount of data your device uses.

Prepare in advance:​ Downloading content through your mobile data plan can be expensive. Most of the time, you can plan ahead by downloading whatever you need via a Wi-Fi connection instead. You can do this with music apps like Spotify, as well as Google Maps for location-based tasks.

 

Technology Basics: Wizard

The word “wizard” may not seem to have much to do with computing, besides calling someone a “computer wiz.” However, there is a particular type of program that serves a very similar purpose, referred to as a wizard as well. We’ll examine it in today’s blog.

What a Wizard Does

Be honest – what first comes to mind when you hear the word “wizard?” Most likely, an old man with a beard, robes, and a pointy hat, waving a wand around and casting spells. These characters often serve as mentors, serving as a guide and a resource.

This is the same purpose that the wizard program serves on your computer. Like Dumbledore instructed Harry Potter and Gandalf pointed Frodo Baggins in the right direction, a software wizard walks a user, step-by-step, to the successful completion some task or goal. This goal is usually the installation and configuration of a program, or possibly running a scan.

What Makes a Wizard?

A software wizard typically breaks up whatever process it applies to into steps, each step represented by a separate page. This allows the wizard to ensure each step is properly completed before progressing with its task. Wizards will often also display progress bars and the like when a process will take some time.

Many wizards today go by different names, or have had their functions absorbed by other programs. Virtual assistants and office assistants both help users in a similar way, but many applications and online forms emulate wizards for the benefit of the user.

 

Tip of the Week: What You’ll Need to Leverage BYOD

Bring Your Own Device has a lot of benefits for businesses, chief among them being giving your users the opportunity to use their own devices for work rather than those provided to them. More often than not, they will benefit from easy-to-use apps on their preferred devices, allowing them to get more done throughout the workday. When you implement BYOD, though, there are various concepts that you have to consider in order to ensure productivity, flexibility, security, and profitability.

Of course, the biggest issue with implementing a BYOD policy is that it can seem a little intimidating to start thinking about. Depending on the type of data being shared, implementing a BYOD strategy might be more complex than you initially think. This possibility is almost guaranteed if your business belongs to a particular industry with specific regulations in mind.

The first part of any BYOD system is making sure that you can track specific devices. You’ll want to know who is in possession of these devices, as well as who can access specific data. You can use a spreadsheet software like Microsoft Excel or Google Sheets to do this. It’s critical that you document all of the following information regarding any employee-owned devices accessing company data:

Employee Name
Device Make/Model/Serial Number
Is there access to File Sharing?
Is there access to Email?
Is there access to the VPN?
Is there access from the VPN?
Is there Remote Desktop access?
What network devices/drives can be accessed?
What apps and licenses are required?

The next step is to determine which kind of mobile management software you’ll be using. If your business doesn’t have one of these, it’s like implementing a security policy with no power to reinforce it. Even though it’s difficult to get users to agree to such a policy, it’s absolutely critical to ensure the integrity of your business’ infrastructure. The typical MDM will provide administrators with access to devices that might not sit well with the average employee. That being said, it’s understandable for a business to manage risk, so hopefully they understand your perspective.

There are other options that aren’t as comprehensive as well–ones that can please everyone without overstepping boundaries. For example, security can be customized for specific applications, and admin controls be used to peer into the devices connected to the network. Admins can also look at specific applications rather than relying on an invasive security system, eliminating a lot of the personal issues that most users might have with such a solution.

Ultimately, you have to be very careful about how you approach mobile device security, as the slightest oversight could potentially create issues for your organization. Does your business need a hand working your way through Bring Your Own Device? Kite Technology Group can help. To learn more, reach out to us at 855-290-KITE.

 

Tip of the Week: How to Restore the Recycle Bin Desktop Icon

Have you ever had your Windows PC lose its Recycle Bin? This has been known to happen since the update to Windows 10, but even updates to Windows 7 and 8.1 have seen similar issues. If your Recycle Bin has pulled a Houdini, we’ll help you get it back. Read on to find out how!

Before you just assume that the Recycle Bin is totally gone, try this method. To begin, open up the Settings app (click on the Start Menu, followed by the Gear). Once you’ve done this, navigate to the Personalization tab. Under Themes, go to the Desktop Icon Settings. If checking the Recycle Bin box doesn’t bring it back, you might have to follow some other steps.

If you’re using a Windows 10 laptop, its tablet mode might be interfering with the normal desktop functionality. This can lead to your desktop icons disappearing. You can change this display mode by going through the Start menu, navigating through Settings to System, and selecting Tablet Mode. You’ll want to make sure the following buttons are turned off:

Hide app icons on the taskbar in tablet mode
Automatically hide the taskbar in tablet mode

Checking these options off should let you see your icons, even if you’re in tablet mode.

If this doesn’t work, you’ll have to recreate your Recycle Bin. To do so, follow these steps:

Open up the Windows File Explorer (open up a folder or This PC from the start menu).
Click on the View tab.
Select Options.
In the Folder Options window, click the tab once again.
Make sure that the Show hidden files, folders, and drives box is selected.
You should also turn off the option to Hide protected operating system files.
Go back to the File Explorer and select PC from the right-hand column.
Select your OS (C:) or C: Drive.
Right-click the $Recycle.Bin and click Send To.
Click on Desktop to create your shortcut.

For help with other irritating aspects of technology, Recycle Bin and all, subscribe to KiteTech’s blog.

 

Technology Basics: Uploads and Downloads

You may have heard the terms “upload” and “download” while going about your daily duties, but do you know what the difference is? While it might be clear that they are two very different things, they both have to do with the transfer of data. These two types of data transfer are used differently in a business setting.

Which One’s Which?
The only difference between download and upload in terms of data transfer is which direction the data is traveling. If you’re using the Internet to conduct research and find some great information, you might be tempted to save a copy of it to your device for easy access at a later date. This would be a download, as you’re the one receiving the data. If you were to put the information onto the Internet somewhere to share it–perhaps in your cloud storage solution–the act of putting it back online, or sending it somewhere, would be uploading it.

Considerations for Uploading and Downloading
Speed is of the utmost importance in computing. The data transfer speed is responsible for delivering important files to you or your clients in a timely manner. This is especially true for any business conducted on the Internet. A faster connection speed means more efficient downloads and uploads, which in turn leads to greater productivity in the long run. You can get an idea for your business’ data transfer speeds through your Internet connection by running a basic speed test.

Granted, there are other factors that play into how effective upload and download speeds are, with one of the major ones being file size. Larger files (like media files) can lead to considerable lag during upload and download times. You might notice a little bit of buffering with your streaming services from time to time, which is a perfect example of this. The difference in this case is that you’re not downloading the entire file all at once, and instead you’re playing the media on demand. Live-streaming is a bit different, as it broadcasts the media in real time.

At the end of the day, downloading and uploading data is going to play a major role in the way you conduct business, so you should know the difference between the two.